Cyber resilience update

Cyber resilience

One of the most important aspects of resilience in the information age is understanding the environment in which we exist. Resilience is adaptability in a changing environment, the more we understand that change, the less painful it is. Here are a few  current issues that might help your cyber resilience.

Alert, but not alarmed
Alert, but not alarmed! – Photo AWebling

Cyber Security Summit – Stanford November 2013

In the shadow of the Snowden revelations about the US and UK, security experts and leaders from more than 40 countries have been at Stanford University in California, USA for a gathering on cyber security.

If you have a sense of irony, you may have listened to the debate on Syria and comparing that to the NSA / Snowden / Internet debate.
– US Secretary of State John Kerry has recently made broad and I think reasonable statements saying that

President Assad had lost the moral authority to rule Syria.

– However that same test can be made against the USA.

 The USA has lost its moral authority to control the Internet

through the activities of the NSA and other government agencies. The full text of Secretary Kerry’s Syria speech can be found here via usembassy.gov. Of course although the USA is the biggest culprit here, the UK, Canada, Australia and NZ have all been shown up.

China was prominently represented at the conference. The Minister of State Council Information spoke about China’s problems. In his speech Cal Mingzhao said that in the first six months of 2013, 20,000  websites were hacked and 8 million servers compromised. According to Minister Mingzhao this indicated a rise of 14% year on year.

China has used the conference to repeat its call for global efforts in building a robust legal system, and strengthening international cooperation. Although I am somewhat cautious about their motives. I believe that the Chinese are on the right track with this view. I have previously made my views clear here in this post about why the world needs the cyber equivalent of an international law of the sea.

It is good to read  that Scott Charney ex US Department of Justice and current Microsoft VP on privacy and security is publicly calling for the US to show more information about what it collects and what happens to that data. Few sensible people disagree that the US and its allies should use maximum efforts against terrorists.

The US has lost support because it has strayed away from its stated goal of combatting terrorists and towards industrial espionage and employed tactics which compromise the majority in the pursuit of this goal such as the backdooring of encryption algorithms.

 

In other news

The Canadian Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions has released a ‘Cyber-Security Self Assessment Guidance for Canadian financial institutions, but which provides some good advice to any organisation looking for a template to help them.

Unlike the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Preliminary Cybersecurity Framework, which was released for public comment on October 22, 2013, the Guidance does not prescribe a common language or mechanism for financial institutions to control and manage cyber security risk nor does it expressly build on existing standards, guidance and best practices for managing cyber security risk. In fact, in the Guidance, OSFI indicates that it “does not currently plan to establish specific guidance for the control and management of cyber risk.”

Rather, the Guidance sets forth an 11-page self-assessment template that sets out “desirable properties and characteristics of cyber security practices that could be considered by a FRFI when assessing the adequacy of its cyber security framework and when planning enhancements to its framework.” Of course if you’re a Canadian bank trying to do business in the US..

www.offi-bsif.gc.ca

Lastly, in the ‘this might be a little insane’ category

A US (Missouri) based cyber crime prevention network is advising parents to teach their children about cyber-security from the time they are toddlers.

www.kshb.com

I can just imagine it – “Our little Johnny fixes our firewall whilst we sit him on the potty…..” But seriously, of course keeping kids safe online is important in the same way as keeping them safe in the real world, but maybe they should learn to read first.

 

 

 

Over-classification restricts information sharing

Over-classification in government continues to restrict information sharing according to a report by the US Department of Defense Inspector General.

Balance in Information Security

I’ve written previously about over-classification and why it needs to be actively countered in large organisations in the private sector and more importantly government. Getting the balance right in information security is critical to mission success.

There are a few key findings from the Inspector General’s report which will be no surprise for anybody who’s worked in a classified environment. The review sampled emails and documents classified by the US Defense Department and found:

  • 100% of the emails reviewed were incorrectly classified or marked
  • Around 70% of the sample material (documents/ files)  had ‘classification discrepancies’

I’d like to say its better in Australia, but I’m not confident. What is more interesting from a security perspective is the over-classification of material. The report states

“we do not believe that those instances concealed violations of law, inefficiency, or administrative error; prevented embarrassment to a person, organization, or agency; restrained competition; or prevented or delayed the release of information not requiring protection in the interest of national security.”

Well they would say that wouldn’t they. But leaving my cynic’s hat off for the moment… Ok one passing comment – there is a difference between the organisational approach which tries not to conceal and the approach of individuals or groups within an organisation.

Unfortunately, the report doesn’t make very many recommendations that will bring about change. In typical public servant speak, it says

We recommend that the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics carry out the recommendations outlined in this report and continue to leverage the new Defense Security Enterprise, especially with regard to ensuring that Original Classification Authorities are fully engaged and accountable.

In any case, the report does acknowledge that

over-classification could unnecessarily restrict information sharing.

Hooray! Admittedly, a bit softer than I would like, but still important.

In this information age where as the Snowden revelations keep showing us,  the US and allies have access to huge swathes of information, but they can’t use it effectively to defend themselves or their allies.

The answer to this problem is not gathering more information! The 9/11 Report and scores of others keep telling us that we have the information in our databases, but we don’t use it effectively.

I’m not sure what the best analogy is here, maybe its a person who’s brain is not connected to their muscles properly. They can see and hear everything, but they rarely succeed in reacting to any of these stimuli. The problem with this analogy is that somebody with locked in syndrome desperately wants to make his limbs move. I’m not  sure this is the case with intelligence agencies and sharing information.

This does seem to be the curse of too much information and not enough brainpower to analyse it and use it properly. Especially when you are looking for the terrorist needle in a haystack. Over-classification is a key issue in the fight against fast evolving terrorist organisations.

Another perspective can be found over at Secrecy News – “DoD Inspector General Report on Over-classification misses the mark“.

More about the USA Department of Defense Inspector General

Alex Webling was the head of protective security in the Australian Attorney-General’s Department.

cyber identity security

Cyber Identity theft service sold personal information on US citizens by compromising multinational consumer and business data aggregators

An identity theft service that sells Social Security numbers, birth records, credit and background reports on millions of US residents has allegedly infiltrated computers at some of America’s largest consumer and business data aggregators, including Dun & Bradstreet according to Krebs on Security. 

If you’re Australian or a resident of other countries where these guys operate, you had better hope that these companies didn’t leak information between their subsidiaries and the main office – because you know that would never ever (cross fingers) happen !!

This looks like a solid investigation by the guys/gals at Krebs. The hackers at the back of this identity theft service didn’t exfiltrate data from their targets wholesale, they just compromised the targets and allowed their customers to directly query information and charged them between 50c and $2.50 US for personal records and up to $15 for credit checks – via Bitcoin or Webmoney of course!

Compromised systems accessed through the criminal service seem to include

Importantly, the compromise was probably targeted as much on gaining information about companies to take out fraudulent loans  on them according to a Gartner analyst. If a criminal can masquerade as a large company, they can take out a much larger loan on their behalf than they could on all but the richest people.

This may take a little while to play out, but it is likely to have an impact on legislative requirements for information security by data aggregator firms. By their very nature, they hold aggregated data from millions of customers. Each piece of data requires protections, together the data becomes far more valuable and therefore a greater target for cyber criminals and foreign espionage. How we deal with aggregation remains one of the keys to the risk based handling of big data.

NSA/GCHQ built vulnerabilities into encryption?

Have the NSA and GCHQ been building vulnerabilities into commercial encryption products?

If this is true, another argument for open source software has been made. Articles in the New York Times and the Guardian  alleged that  the N.S.A. has been deliberately weakening the international encryption standards adopted by developers. One goal in the agency’s 2013 budget request was to “influence policies, standards and specifications for commercial public key technologies,” .

The problem with this approach is that the NSA and GCHQ have two roles and it would seem that they have failed to balance them. This is the question of intelligence equities. These organisations are charged to reveal the secrets of their enemies, but also to protect the information of their countries. By building back doors into software and hardware being sold to unsuspecting customers, they are doing what they have accused the Chinese of doing.

Moreover the fact that these backdoor vulnerabilities exist, mean that others can find and use them, not just NSA and GCHQ but also other cyber criminals.

It is the ultimate hubris to think that NSA and GCHQ are the only ones capable of discovering and exploiting these vulnerabilities. “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.”  George Orwell1984 . No organisation as large as the NSA can do this forever.

The USA tried under President Clinton to make all manufacturers insert a hardware ‘clipper’ chip  into their devices, but the backlash was such that the US government withdrew support for the idea. What this information is telling us is that the NSA didn’t give up and found alternative means to realise the  concept.

The only logical conclusion from this revelation is that the signals intelligence agencies are unable to both reveal the enemies’ secrets and protect those of their citizens at the same time. They should be split. The information assurance role should come under the control of the trade, infrastructure and industry portfolios.

 

You can find the NYT article here – http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/us/nsa-foils-much-internet-encryption.html?pagewanted=all 

You can find the Guardian article here – http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/05/nsa-gchq-encryption-codes-security

Cyber-Security doesn’t stop at the virtual perimeter

News that the New York Times was hacked by the Syrian Electronic Army  is interesting not because of the fact that NYT was hacked by the hacking group, but by the method of gaining access.

According to this article, information security at the NYT fell over because they forgot that cyber-security doesn’t stop at the perimeter. It would seem that MelbourneIT , an Australian hosting company for both Twitter and NYT was breached. This then allowed the Syrian Electronic Army to gain access to the DNS records of domains owned by Twitter and NYT which they then proceeded to change.

A number of quick conclusions

  1. This was a well planned attack almost certainly took some time to conceive, research and operationalise.
  2. You should assume your organisation will be hacked. Work out how to detect the breach and recover quickly.
  3. Cyber-security is an evolutionary struggle between those who wish to break systems and those who wish to stop systems being broken. Quite often its the same people eg NSA
  4. 80-90% of the differences between good cyber-security and great cyber-security are not in the IT, they are in the organisational approach and culture.
  5. In this hack, a variety of methods seem to have been used, including phishing and attacking the DNS servers via privilege escalation.
  6. Cyber-security requires expertise in managing information, risk and developing resilient organisational frameworks, something often forgotten.
  7. Everybody is your neighbour on the Internet, the good guys and the bad.
  8.  Cyber-security practitioners need to consider the risks to high-value systems that they are protecting from connected suppliers and customers.
  9. This requires cyber-security practitioners who are good people influencers, because the vulnerabilities tend to be at human interfaces.

Further technical details have been posted here.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alextorrenegra/
New York Times – by ATorrenegra

 

Contact Resilience Outcomes to discuss how we can help your organisation become more resilient at [email protected]

 

 

Getting cyber security on the company board agenda

Making strategic decisions about cyber security, or any sort of security needs to be done a the board level. It is difficult to get company boards to focus on strategic issues, despite the fact that this is what they are theoretically meant to do. Companies are busy places and there are always minute issues that take time from board meetings. In some companies, the culture is such that managers avoid their responsibility by sending decisions to the board, again robbing the board of valuable time.

The Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure, a UK Government organisation, has released a short document aimed at helping security managers get cyber security onto the corporate agenda. CPNI makes the somewhat obvious point that getting buy-in from a company board is crucial to the successful outcome of a cyber security implementation project.

Although the CPNI paper doesn’t spell it out quite this way, the key is to show in a concise manner why security is of importance to them and the company they are responsible for. Generally the key issues fall into three categories.

  1. Financial – the loss due to another entity (government, business, criminal) gaining commercially sensitive information. The effect of this can be short term where a negotiation is damaged or longer term where valuable intellectual property is lost.
  2. Legal – many organisations are subject to regulatory requirements to protect information that they hold on behalf of clients, stakeholders and staff. In Australia, the Australian Privacy Principles come into force in March 2014. Most private sector organisations will be required to adhere to them. Financial and professional organisations have been required to meet similar requirements for a number of years.
  3. Reputational – High profile privacy breaches have affected a number of large companies. Companies such as Sony, Heartland and RSA have suffered huge breaches which cost them millions of dollars to clean up and resulted in significant lost business. In some cases, they have resulted in tightened regulation which in turn increased the cost of doing business.
rsa fob
RSA key generator
Playstation breach - Sony contrite
Playstation breach – Sony contrite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Things to remember

  • most if not all board members will not have a good understanding of the Internet or information security (Tech companies are the exception of course).
  • boards are generally made up of people who are very clever and need you to acknowledge it – presentations need to be logical but also require little subject specific knowledge.
  • If you are the expert, you need to have the answer when one board member starts talking about “his daughter’s computer” or the spam she “gets on the company email” that she doesn’t get at home – this is where a well briefed chair is important
  • the best briefings work when board members are given details of current, real world examples of similar companies’ misfortunes. You can bet that Microsoft looked very hard at the Sony hack at the board level and that CA examined the breach of RSA tokens carefully!
  • Sometimes an outside expert needs to be brought in to tell the board what the security cell already knows. It is a funny quirk of human nature that we sometimes don’t give enough respect to the people in our own organisation.

That’s where you can call on us to help you get your message across. We have experience talking to boards and senior executives from government, councils, banks and companies including those in the DISP.

The CPNI paper is here http://www.cpni.gov.uk/documents/publications/2013/2013009-influencing_company_boards.pdf?epslanguage=en-gb

Australia’s CERT also publishes advisories which are useful (disclosure – Alex Webling was the founding director of Govcert.au) https://www.cert.gov.au/advisories

 

 

Information Security for health practitioners

Is it possible for health practitioners to  achieve information security?  Maybe a better question is  “How can health professionals balance privacy, information security and accessibility in an online world?” Or even, should the medical profession be bothered with keeping private and sensitive information secure?

Over the last few months, I’ve been working with a number of health practitioners to help them improve their information security. Much of this has been done with a view to the introduction of electronic health records.

I sympathise with hospital administrators, doctors and nurses. They don’t have a lot of time to think about security and privacy. However, the fact is that they have to do better.

monash university - surgery clinic 2012

Criminals follow the money

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, the health system costs just under 10% of Australia’s GDP (AUD121.4 billion in 2009/10 according to the AIHW) . In the US, it is around 18% (USD2.6 trillion in 2010 according to the CDC).  With this much money involved in the health system, it is a fat series of targets for cyber attack and fraud.

Terrorist vector? Probably not.

The Department of Homeland Security has even gone so far as to suggest that the health system could be targeted by terrorists and activists in the USA. I am not convinced by this or similar suggestions as the no1 aim of terrorists remains to create terror. Terrorists understand this and seek targets and methods along those lines. It matters less how few people a terrorist kills. It is more important for the terrorists that they have an audience that can clearly see a hard link between cause (terrorist attack) and effect (death, destruction etc). The  murder of a single UK soldier in May 2013 by allegedly Al-Qaeda inspired terrorists with machetes has created significant community angst, not only in the UK where it occurred  but in Australia, Canada and the USA. Yet, it is likely that more people died on that same day on the roads in London. My point is this, that if terrorists discovered some way of causing significant death or maiming from medical equipment, I do not doubt that they would use it. However, it is likely that the effect on the collective public consciousness would not be as great as the machete attack mentioned above.

However, we must accept that it is possible, if not altogether probable. One identified flaw is the chronic inability of many health systems to patch their software and applications.

One high consequence scenario involves hackers attacking defibrillators and insulin delivery systems remotely. I think this comes into the unlikely but possible category. Shodan, was used by a hacker to access the controls of a blood glucose monitor connected to the Internet by WiFi.

Whilst we can probably discount to some extent the terrorist threat, I can imagine the attraction of such attacks as assassination vectors or for the installation of ‘ransomware‘. Thus the high consequence threat from foreign governments and organised crime can’t be as easily discounted.

Beyond the extreme, privacy compromise and fraud

Beyond these extreme events, there is the possibility that patient or staff privacy can be compromised by weak information security. Dr Avi Rubin, a computer scientist and technical director of the Information Security Institute at Johns Hopkins University, talking about the US health system has been quoted . “If our financial industry regarded security the way the health-care sector does, I would stuff my cash in a mattress under my bed.”…. Unfortunately, it is not possible to hide one’s health under the mattress!

I experienced this personally about a week ago when my daughter’s optometrist sent through the results of her recent eye test, only it wasn’t. The attachment data was for somebody I had never met.

We have a tendency to compare the worst case scenario of e-health privacy with the best case scenario of the current system. We all know that it isn’t the case as my example above shows.

Good information security will also help protect healthcare organisations from fraud. Fraud is estimated to be a USD60 Billion impost on US hospitals. Methods that are being used by fraudsters include

  • Diversion of fee revenue
  • Diversion of controlled items (eg drugs)
  • Collusion with suppliers; and
  • Diversion of accounts receivable.

The same methods are being used in medical practices, albeit on a smaller scale.

What to do

A holistic approach is needed. We have worked with a number of medical practices to implement the key elements of the information security standard ISO 27000. This ensures that the practice has a risk based approach which mitigates threats based on real world experience of consequence and likelihood. Working with practice owners and stakeholders, we determine tolerance to information risk and work with them to implement controls which make sense and meet any regulatory requirements.

If you think this is something your organisation needs, please contact us at [email protected]

Hacking the spies – or how to counter the cyber insurgency

You may have seen some fairly alarmist reporting from the ABC about Chinese interests hacking ASIO, Australia’s version of the FBI.

Information Dominos 1

 

New espionage?

For those who haven’t seen it. The allegations come from the Four Corners program and relate to compromises of sub-contractors of ASIO. ASIO is building a huge new central office and it seems that the Chinese managed to get the blueprints for the building. ASIO is a hard nut for a foreign intelligence agency to attack, so the way to get there is to use their contractors.

The point is that this is not any different from what would have occurred during the cold war! The Chinese or Russians for that matter would have previously used their human intelligence networks. It seems likely that this information would have been a target 50 years ago just as much as now.

Information Dominos 2

What is different then?

The difference is the sheer quantity of attacks that are occurring. We have moved from the Cold War, where the superpowers fought their battles in small third countries such as in South America, Africa or the Middle East to the new paradigm – the cyber insurgency. The wars between the superpowers have moved onshore to the malls and industrial parks of our cities and then they disappear. The authorities and companies are never quite sure who to trust and when / where the insurgent hackers will reappear.

The guerrilla must swim in the people as the fish swims in the sea.” –Aphorism based on the writing of Mao Zedong

Previously foreign intelligence agencies needed to identify targets and then find resources to compromise them. The new method is to attack anything that might be interesting and suck up whatever comes back. Spies no longer have the difficulty to get the information, they have the challenge to find the needles in the haystack. And they don’t differentiate between business and government. According to reports in the New York Times and a detailed report by Mandiant, any organisation that doesn’t protect its information security, whether private or public is potentially compromised.

4d

How can my organisation protect itself?

Paraphrasing the principles of counter-insurgency as espoused by David Galula and Robert Thompson

– the aim of the war is to gain the support of the population rather than control of territory

– most of the population will be neutral in the conflict.

– support of the population may be lost. The population must be efficiently protected to allow it to cooperate without fear of retribution

– in the guerilla phase of an insurgency, a government must secure its base areas first

Using these principles we can identify a strategic direction

The way to deal with an insurgency is through hearts and minds.Information Dominos 6

Organisations, whether government agencies or business need to share information with their public and other organisations. Only in this way can they create defence in-depth and help them protect themselves. The attacks on ASIO demonstrate that an organisations’ security is only as good as the weakest link. Importantly, the perimeters of risk in any organisation do not stop at the front door- if they ever did. Organisations suffer from hubris if they believe otherwise. This is why the concepts of deperimeterisation as espoused by the Jericho Foundation and others are so useful.

Organisations need to work out what they need to protect and set about protecting that. Declassification, although counter-intuitive is one way that can help organisations work out what information is valuable.

Organisations need to be adaptable and willing to work with the fact that most information will become available to their adversaries. They need to take advantage of the information in the intervening time.

By making information security central to their organisational decision process, organisations can become more adaptable to this evolving threat. This means moving the security officer from the corner office to the top-level of the organisation. In turn, the security officer needs to change his/her attitude from the ‘computer says no’ person, to the one who says, yes, this is the best way we can do it to make the organisation’s aims with tolerable risk.

Such an organisation is indeed resilient.  Change needs to come in the leadership of government and organisations to deal with it. I’m not sure they understand how big this challenge will be.

Information, if you don't protect it, it just fades away
Information, if you don’t protect it, it just fades away

 

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Information Declassification – A way for governments to save money and improve their information security

In the digital world it is very easy to create data, very difficult to get rid of it

Like us all, government agencies are creating huge amounts of information. Lots of it is classified either to protect privacy or for national security. This is what should happen, classification is an important aspect of information security.

What is data classification?

It is the process of assigning a business impact level to a piece of data or a system. This then governs how many resources are directly devoted to their protection. By classifying documents and systems an organisation makes risk managed decisions on how information is protected.

Graphic by Mark Smiciklas
Graphic by Mark Smiciklas, Flickr.com/photos/intersectionconsulting

Digital data wants to be free and it is expensive to ensure confidentiality if you also want to maintain data integrity and availability.

However over-classification of information can be as bad for an organisation as under classification. This is particularly true of large government organisations.

In addition, Government agencies tend to be risk averse places anyway – which on balance is a good thing!

So how could governments shift the classification balance, improve security and improve efficiency in agencies?

The problem is that the person who classifies data or systems does not have to pay for the cost of their actions in classifying. In fact, the individual avoids personal risk if a  piece of data is over-classified. However their agency has to wear the added expense.

Gentle readers, we have a problem of incentive imbalance!

Suppose it costs $100 to store a Secret document for its lifetime and $10 to store an everyday unclassified document. If governments placed a nominal value on document creation relative to the whole of life costs, it might be possible to stem the tide of increasing amounts of classified data.

If under this scheme a government employee wishes to create a secret classified document, they would need to find $100 in their budget to do so. In this case the employee might consider producing an unclassified document or one that was slightly classified. I argue that this market based approach to declassification would have far more effect than more rules.

A plan for implementation

So how might the plan be implemented in the tight fiscal environment that government agencies currently face, even though it is likely to save money long term?

  1. Survey government agencies to see how many classified pieces of data they produce each year by type. eg, there might be 500 top secret data pieces and 1000 secret.
  2. Assign a dollar value to each document according to the level of protection it receives. This bit would require a bit of research or possibly a pilot scheme.
  3. Based on the previous year’s classified information output, each agency is given a declassification budget. It might be considered that as this task was one that the agency should have been doing previously, that there is no requirement for central funding.
  4. Require each agency to report the numbers of classified data produced.
  5. Agencies that produced too many classified documents would need to pay the treasury a fine equivalent to the cost of storing the extra documents in archives.
  6. Agencies that produced fewer pieces of data than the previous year would receive a windfall.

That’s it in a nutshell. As governments produce more data, they will need to store it. Balancing the incentives to overclassify and underclassify data will help ensure that information is properly protected.

I’d love to hear your ideas, please make a comment

Alex

 

 

Cloud cybersecurity, resilience, infrastructure

ENISA, Europe’s network and information security agency, just released a report looking at cloud computing from the perspective of critical infrastructure protection.

ENISA asserts that 80% of large organisations will be using cloud solutions within two years. The approach that ENISA takes is nicely balanced, pointing out that cloud adoption is both good and bad in terms of critical infrastructure protection. From an organisational perspective, the message is similar

Like any information security endeavour, adoption of cloud boils down to a series of risk decisions. There is of course also a question of organisational and possibly national resilience in the case of critical infrastructure to adapt if any threats are realised.

Cloud is not bulletproof and is not the solution for all problems related to IT. A number of companies were affected by outages of the Amazon service in 2011 and this has provided a wake up call to the industry – http://www.wired.com/business/2011/04/lessons-amazon-cloud-failure/

Clouds
Light streaming through clouds

However, it is possible to use the cloud securely for many applications. It requires resources devoted to intelligent system design. This means that the business case for cloud adoption is not one necessarily about saving money. One company that uses the Amazon service, but did not get affected in 2011 was Netflix. Netflix has a very clever piece of software called Chaosmonkey which tests its environment during working hours with the intention that systems are fixed before they break. Netflix released the software as open source in July 2012. http://techblog.netflix.com/2012/07/chaos-monkey-released-into-wild.html

STRENGTHS

Cloud providers can afford people, processes and equipment which is state of the art

Cloud providers able to offer very good uptime and good backup.

Cloud provides good mitigation against natural disasters

Elasticity – Cloud offerings are able to increase and decrease load dynamically, this allows them to mitigate against DDOS attacks

WEAKNESSES

Cloud providers concentrate datasets from disparate organisations

Vulnerabilities are shared across the cloud

Even though cloud providers generally have excellent protective security, failures happen (eg Amazon in 2011)

Cloud providers located in different jurisdictions add complexity to the compliance and governance of organisations.

OPPORTUNITIES

Better collaboration with other organisations, integration of supply chain across disparate organisations and locations.

Organisations that utilise cloud well can become more resilient  eg Netflix

Code optimisation

THREATS

Cloud providers concentrate datasets so their ‘attractiveness’ as a target increases (aggregation)

An outage in one cloud provider can have consequences for multiple organisations. Additional issues may become apparent if those organisations are all providers of the same critical infrastructure.
A legal dispute related to data owned by one organisation which is located in the cloud might affect others

The threat from human actors can be seen to be the combination of intent and capability. Both organised crime and nation states have the capability to attack cloud providers. Their intent is obviously higher if they assess that they can access several prize organisations through a single attack.

I’m struck by the thought that the emergence of cloud should mean that risks to the critical infrastructure from natural disasters and mistakes should decrease.  However, on the other hand, cloud providers are such attractive targets, that the risks from human (active) threats are likely to be higher.

Importantly, the report makes a number of useful suggestions for organisations that are moving towards the use of cloud solutions in terms of risk assessment, security measures and recovery and reporting of incidents.

To download the report go to the ENISA site www.enisa.europa.eu or follow this link http://goo.gl/NZRQA which should take you to the right part of the site.