Useful trick to add a nick to your google+ account leads to the darkside

I’ve been updating the Resilience Outcomes Google+ site. A friend asked me what the site url is, but Google in its wisdom has not made this easy. The site reference is https://plus.google.com/103380459753062778553 !!! What a mouthful and not really a set of numbers I want to dedicate my diminishing neurons on. A partial answer is http://gplus.to/  . Using this site you can get a nickname or vanity url for your gplus site.

So now I can give the url http://gplus.to/resilienceoutcomes and you get to the Resilience Outcomes Google+ site!

My friend Karl H. is going to point out that this is not very resilient, because although Google has a reputation for fairly bulletproof infrastructure I know nothing about gplus.to . Karl you’re absolutely right – it demonstrates why thinking about resilience is so difficult… The Dark side has cookies! Literally in the case of gplus.to.

http://gplus.to/ is almost certainly more fragile than google.com or .Google or whatever it will call itself next month. If http://gplus.to/ goes down then all the efforts of google to support their systems are naught in my case. As such, I am faced on a small-scale the choice faced by all who wish to become more resilient and mainstream security. Do I increase accessibility to the site whilst reducing integrity and confidentiality or not? In this case, the question is not an either or, and rarely is it ever. The answer may be in my case that http://gplus.to/ is used when friends ask me what the site is verbally, but that I always write the full url in posts.

🙂

 

 

 

Published by

Alex Weblng

BSc, BA (Hons), Gdip Comms, GdipEd, ZOP

Alex has 20 years of experience in the Australian Government working in the fields of national security, information and cyber-security, counter-terrorism, , nuclear science, chemical and biological security, protective security and critical infrastructure protection, identity security, biometrics, and resilience.

Alex was the foundation Director of the Australian Government computer emergency response team, GovCERT.au (later CERT Australia). He developed and project managed a world first program to train CERTs in developing APEC countries.

Alex set up the Trusted Information Sharing Network Resilience Community of Interest in 2008 and produced the first Australian Government Executive Guide to Resilience.

Head of Protective Security Policy in 2010, Alex was responsible for launching the revised Protective Security Policy Framework and the single information classification system for the Australian Government.

Alex has both significant experience and tertiary qualifications in the CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) area. He was head of the Chemical Security Branch of the Attorney-General’s Department; responsible for nuclear policy during the construction of the Australian OPAL reactor; and represented the Attorney-General’s Department in the Security Sensitive Biological Agents development process, bringing to it a pragmatic, risk driven approach.

As Director of Identity and Biometric Security Policy, Alex was responsible for developing the successful proposal to expand the Australian Document Verification Service into the private sector in 2012.

Alex has been a member of the Australasian Council of Security Professionals since 2011 and a registered security professional in the area of Security Enterprise Management with the Security Professionals Register of Australasia.